The Games Breakdown module of Store Intelligence measures Download and Revenue performance of Game Sub-categories on the App Store or Google Play. You can learn more in our support documentation about how we define Downloads and Revenue. Games Breakdown is similar to Store Summary, but only downloads and revenue from games are counted, and instead of filtering by app categories, you can filter by game categories.



Game categories are different on the App Store and Google Play. On Google Play, all games belong to exactly one game category. There are no sub-categories, the structure is flat. On the App Store, apps have a primary category and, optionally, a secondary category. If either of those categories are Games, then the app may also belong to zero, one, or two game sub-categories. There is no primary game sub-category. 


Since most games on the App Store will belong to two sub-categories, it can be easy to accidentally double-count downloads and revenue. (It’s also possible for apps to not be counted at all, if they’re not published with any sub-category, like Pokemon Go). We’ve put some restrictions in place on the Games Breakdown frontend when the App Store is selected to avoid double-counting.


Only the Line Plot Type is allowed when multiple game categories are selected. There is no 'Totals' row in the Game Category view for downloads and revenue tables. Lastly, Country and Device views only allow a single game category to be selected at a time.


These restrictions do not apply to Google Play. Because the App Store and Play have slightly different game categories, the Unified store is not supported in Games Breakdown.


Games Breakdown only supports current (non-deprecated) actual game categories. On the App Store, legacy game categories “Dice” and “Educational” are not supported. On Google Play, legacy game categories “Game/Widgets” and “Game/Wallpapers” are also not supported. Additionally, “Family” is sometimes presented as a game category in Google Play, but is actually a different kind of classification, which overlaps with actual game categories and in this context, would introduce double-counted data.


Games Breakdown provides important data on the games segment of both app storefronts. It can help identify consumer trends and which categories are most competitive.